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You are invited to submit a 1-2 page autobiographical essay or first person creative nonfiction(essays/memoirs) for this anthology .
The aim of Our Black is to create a book comprised of narratives on the Black Experience and the multiplicity of Blackness. The goal of Our Black is to build a collection of narratives that reflect the diverse experiences of Black folk, one which could be used to better understand the complexity, depth, and challenges of Being and living Black.
The book Our Black will be divided into these thematic chapters:
Acceptance and Ambiguous Blackness: Multi-Racial Identity in AmericaBe A Man: The Burden of Black MasculinityBinary Minorities: Being Both Black and LGBTQ(IA)Never Black Enough: Outside the Scope of Legitimate BlacknessThe Intersection of Gender and Race: Being a black woman in americaNot Quite African-American: Black immigrants and First generation AmericansBlack Self Identity: How Much is Blackness Defined by Whiteness?
If interested please send us an email at zellie.imani [@] gmail.com for more information and a copy of our writers’ guidelines. We will be accepting submissions until March 1, 2014.
Please feel free to share this post as you please. I am truly blessed to be working on a project such as this and I am driven by its potential. With much work and dedication, this can be turned into something phenomenal.
All the best,
zellie imani
I don’t have the answers. Writing is my way of trying to figure out my feelings.
Black Culture Short Story Project
We will be reading and discussing short stories by Black authors. 
December read-along: “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin
Join below; link to the short story in the discussion group link!
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1599778-december-read-along-sonny-s-blues-by-james-baldwin
I wrote this 2 am last night in my journal while trying to come to terms with my Aunt’s passing. Maybe someone could relate. So I thought i’d share. - @zellieimani
The 15 Fiction Titles That Every African American Should Read
Literature by Black authors is largely ignored or marginalized in literary canons. This is not because there aren’t any works worthy enough for inclusion but because of the overarching domination of institutional racism and sexism. Here, we celebrate some of black literature’s classic fiction titles spanning many different genres.
First on the list is Their Eyes is Watching God.
Blending the colorful and vibrant language of African American Vernacular, “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” is widely acknowledged as an American classic. A journey of self-discovery, Hurston tells the life of Janie, an African American woman, and her story tragedy and suppression in a process of self-actualization.

Read the rest of the list on Black Culture right now. 
Leave a comment of what book you think i’ve missed!
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Bringing together news and articles, culture, entertainment and fashion, Black Culture features positive and vibrant images, all focusing on the African-American experience
Opening in 2 weeks!
Visit and Enter your email for a chance to win a FREE copy of Cornel West’s Race Matters or bell hook’s Feminism is for Everybody.
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The trials and tribulations of young Winter Santiaga are described in gritty detail in this coming-of-age novel, the first by the phenomenally popular rap star who frequently lectures on the themes of this novel: overcoming teenage pregnancy, fatherless households, and drug use in African American communities. 
The bestselling urban classic novel about a young woman coming of age in the late 1980s.
Tracy Ellison, a young knockout with tall hair and attitude, is living life as fast as she can. Motivated by the material world, she and her friends love and leave the young men who will do anything to get next to them. It’s only when the world of gratuitous sex threatens heartbreak that Tracy begins to examine her life, her goals, and her sexuality.

For The Soldiers.

xolovelier:

His low eyes are intriguing, 
they’re filled with long hours and strain.
They’re filled with stress and skepticism.
They’re so inTENSE.


His jawline evokes the rigid warrior who sets out everyday defending all that is his; teeth clenched and displaying every aching muscle in his face. 
His forearms are laced with streams of contour and filled with potential;
very able and very willing.


His stance is tough, feet firmly placed.
The stance of a soldier, the stance of
a black man.
Stand tall my black man.

He’s ready for the battle. The never ending battle.
The battle that he has fought for so many years.
The battle that always fails to subside.


He has been here the longest yet, never fails to be regressed,
never fails to feel the shackles,
never fails to be oppressed.


He’s hurt, he’s worked, he’s shot, he’s locked, he’s spent, he’s tense, but he’s still strong.


Fast forward and we’re here now, still fighting our battles.
We live in no utopia but its
freedom time.
Feel secure my black man,
lay back and radiate tranquility.
Ease into my spirit and rest.

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Black Culture Book Club September 2013: Twelve Years a Slave

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Twelve Years a Slave (Originally published in 1853 with the sub-title: “Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New-York, kidnapped in Washington city in 1841, and rescued in 1853, from a cotton plantation near the Red River in Louisiana”) is the written work of Solomon Northup; a man who was born free, but was bound into slavery later in life.

To choose our book for September, we used a reader poll over in the community, and @SirChazR suggested we read Twelve Years a slave before the movie starring Chiwetel Ejiofor is released.

 

Schedule

We’re giving you two weeks to get your hands on the book and read the first 10 chapters. We’ll post the first discussion on Monday, September 16th, and then every Monday for the remainder of the month. We’ll announce the October selection a week or so before that one starts up.

Details

The discussions will take place over twitter on Mondays at 9PM with the hashtag #bcbookclub w/ @zellieimani

and threads on my facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ZellieImani until we get enough members to create our own group/page.

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Black Culture Book Club September 2013: Twelve Years a Slave

image

Twelve Years a Slave (Originally published in 1853 with the sub-title: “Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New-York, kidnapped in Washington city in 1841, and rescued in 1853, from a cotton plantation near the Red River in Louisiana”) is the written work of Solomon Northup; a man who was born free, but was bound into slavery later in life.

To choose our book for September, we used a reader poll over in the community, and @SirChazR suggested we read Twelve Years a slave before the movie starring Chiwetel Ejiofor is released.

 

Schedule

We’re giving you two weeks to get your hands on the book and read the first 10 chapters. We’ll post the first discussion on Monday, September 16th, and then every Monday for the remainder of the month. We’ll announce the October selection a week or so before that one starts up.

Details

The discussions will take place over twitter on Mondays at 9PM with the hashtag #bcbookclub

and threads on my facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ZellieImani until we get enough members to create our own group/page.

 

 

 

 

Northup’s account describes the daily life of slaves in Bayou Beof, their diet, the relationship between the master and slave, the means that slave catchers used to recapture them and the ugly realities that slaves suffered. 

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Who Is Your Favorite Black Author? Results

Earlier this week I asked here on Black Culture and on my twitter(@zellieimani) the question, “Who is your favorite Black author?” 


“A great book should leave you with many experiences, and slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading.” 

Here are some of the responses.

1stworldproblemchild answered: Alice Walker. The Color Purple is still the best thing I’ve read.

insane-love-affair answered: Eric Jerome Dickey. He doesn’t always stick to the same story line. I love it.

abluesforbrklyn answered: Depends on the genre… But I’ll say Toni Morrison & Maya Angelou, off top.

@awkwardafrodeeziak answered: I have a strong liking for multiple Black authors, but Octavia Butler stuck to me the most with Kindred. That book really inspired me.

@blondy44world answered: I love Haki Madhubuti, writer, poet, Chair of English Dept, English Professor, @ Chicago State.

qb-colquitt answered: First name that comes to mind is Alex Haley, followed by James Baldwin & W.E.B. DuBois.

fmlicious answered: It’s a tie between bell hooks and Toni Morrison

tiffee answered: James Baldwin, W.E.B. DuBios (duh), Toni Morrison and Terry McMillan (I know! I know!)

starryskiesabove answered: Rasheedah Sharif (Don’t Come Down from the Chinaberry Tree) Not many people know about this book but it is amazing and so is the author :)

jannehfashions answered: (Male) Chinua Achebe - (Female) Maya Angelou

chicblackchick answered: reading i know why the caged bird sings in middle school literally changed my life. Maya Angelou!!

wakartist answered: Virginia Hamilton, Octavia Butler, Chester Himes, Walter Mosley, Toni Morrison (of course), August Wilson (of course), Ellison and Baldwin.

curlyhairedwanderer answered: Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison.

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Who is your favorite Black author?

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What black books would you recommend for a teenager?

 
The following list is by no means exhaustive

"Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member" by Sanyika Shakur

"Makes Me Wanna Holler: A Young Black Man in America" by Nathan McCall

"The Autobiography of Malcolm X" by Alex Haley

"The Mis-Education of the Negro" by Carter G Woodson

"Race Matters" by Cornell West

"The New Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness" by Michelle Alexander

"State of Emergency" by Dr Jawanza Kunjufu

"Stolen Legacy" by George G.M James

"We Real Cool" by bell hooks

And though, not a black book, “The People’s History Of The United States” By Howard Zinn is an excellent book for information they did not teach you in history class. As Zinn states, “There is not a country in world history in which racism has been more important, for so long a time, as the United States.”

All of these books will begin to give you an understanding as a teenager a larger worldview and the begin to equip you with the tools to analyze and critique the world you live in.

Black Love

zellie imani

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